Democracy That Delivers

Piccone, Ted

Ted Piccone

Brookings Institution

Education:

Mr. Piccone received a law degree from Columbia University, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the Columbia Human Rights Law Review and The Jailhouse Lawyer’s Manual.  He received a B.A. in History magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania. 

Professional Experience:

Ted Piccone is a foreign policy and legal expert on issues of democracy, human rights, international organizations and U.S.-Latin American affairs. 

He was the Executive Director and Co-Founder of the Democracy Coalition Project, a research and advocacy organization working to promote international cooperation for democracy around the world.  In November 2002, the Project released Defending Democracy: A Global Survey of Foreign Policy Trends, a first-ever assessment of democracy promotion policies of 40 governments around the world.  The Project monitors efforts by democratic governments to promote democracy and human rights through international initiatives like the Community of Democracies, and produces a regular scorecard of United Nations voting patterns on human rights issues.  Mr. Piccone also served as the Washington Office Director of the Club of Madrid, an association of 70 former heads of state and government engaged in efforts to strengthen democracy.

Previously, Mr. Piccone served eight years as a senior foreign policy advisor in the Clinton Administration.  He was the Associate Director of the Policy Planning Staff for Secretary of State Madeleine Albright (1998-2001), Director for Inter-American Affairs at the National Security Council (1996-98), and Policy Advisor in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (1993-1996).  Mr. Piccone also served as Counsel for the United Nations Truth Commission in El Salvador and as Press Secretary to U.S. Rep. Bob Edgar. 

Other:

Mr. Piccone has written and published articles on transitional justice, international organizations, and democracy promotion policy.  His most recent publications include Strategies for Democratic Change: Assessing the Global Response (June 2006, edited with Richard Youngs); a chapter on “International Mechanisms to Protect Democracy,” in Protecting Democracy: International Responses (Lexington Books, 2004); and Regime Change by the Book: Constitutional Tools to Preserve Democracy (2004).  He has lectured frequently at academic institutions including the U.S. Army War College, Johns Hopkins University and Amherst College.  He speaks regularly at international conferences on issues of globalization, democracy promotion and foreign affairs.

Club de Madrid
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